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Sounds and Plant Growth

Joel Sternheimer, a French physicist discovered that for each atomic particle (electron, lamba, sigma, etc...) there corresponds a frequency. This "music" of the elementary particles means that we, who are composed of these elementary particles, are also composed of musical frequencies.

www.earthpulse.com reported that Sternheimer discovered the mechanism of how plants respond to being stimulated by sound waves. Steinheimer measure the frequencies of amino acids in plants. When the tones were played in the order that they occurred naturally in the plant’s protein (amino acids combine to make the plant’s protein) the plant growth doubled. Each plant has a unique song.

According to New Science, Sternheimer claims that when plants hear the appropriate tune of a protein, they produce more of that protein. Sternheimer also writes tunes that inhibit the protein that can be used like weed killer - without poisonous effects on the environment. Sternheimer claims to have stopped the mosaic virus by playing notes sequences that inhibited enzymes required by the virus.

Sternheimer writes that in experiments, tomatoes exposed to his melodies grew two-and-a-half times as large as those, which were untreated. Some of the treated tomatoes were sweeter in addition to being significantly larger.

Likewise each molecule in our body can be reactivated through resonance if it 'hears' its corresponding molecular melody.

[1] Maman, Fabien. The Role of Music in the Twenty-First Century.
Boulder, Co: Tama Do Press.1997; Pg. 15.
[2] https://earthpulse.com/science/
"French Physicist Creates New Melodies - Plant Songs." Sept 3, 2005; Pg. 2.
[3] https://earthpulse.com/science/
"French Physicist Creates New Melodies - Plant Songs." Sept 3, 2005; Pg. 2.
[4] https://earthpulse.com/science/
"French Physicist Creates New Melodies - Plant Songs." Sept 3, 2005; Pg. 3.
[5] https://earthpulse.com/science/
"French Physicist Creates New Melodies - Plant Songs." Sept 3, 2005; Pg. 3.
[6] Maman, Fabien. The Role of Music in the Twenty-First Century.
Boulder, Co: 1997.